Hear the Text, but Hear it Slant: Liturgy Notes

1. Beatitudes (Mt 5:1-12)

What if this isn’t a list of instructions? What if it’s a list of who you should suck up to? ie, a list of the really important people. What if it’s Jesus doing here what he did when he washed the disciples’ feet, and inverting/subverting/recreating hierarchy?

  • the possessors of the kingdom of heaven: the poor [in spirit]
  • those who God will console: the mourners
  • the heirs to the land: the meek
  • those who God will satisfy: the hungry and thirsty [for righteousness]
  • those to whom God will show mercy: the merciful
  • those who will see God: the clean of heart
  • the children of God: the peacemakers
  • the possessors of the kingdom of heaven: the persecuted [for righteousness’ sake]
  • those whose reward will be great in heaven: the insulted and persecuted and slandered for Jesus’ sake

Written this way, with the last phrases first, I see a chiasm (envelope form) from verses 3-10, with mercy in the central, most important location. Happy Jubilee Year of Mercy!

2. Who comes in the name of the Lord?

The setting of the Sanctus that we’re singing has an echo, sung by the choir:

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord (who comes in the name of the Lord)

But this week, I didn’t hear it as an echo: I heard it as a challenge: Who comes in the name of the Lord? You??
You sure about that? You up to that?
You wear that name Christian, you come in that name: would you pass that challenge?

3. Under Whose Roof

Happy are those who are called to the supper of the Lamb.
Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof

Called to the supper of the Lamb — read eschatologically, that’s a future invitation to a feast: come into the home of the Lamb, enter under Jesus’ roof, and share a feast.

Our response? We tell Jesus, with the Roman centurion, we’re not worthy for you to come into our home, to enter under our roof.

That’s weirdly reciprocal, but inverted.
If we’re not worthy for Jesus to enter under our roof, how much less worthy are we to enter under his?

To us, also, your servants, who, though sinners, hope in your abundant mercies, graciously grant some share and fellowship with your holy Apostles and Martyrs: with John the Baptist, Stephen, Matthias, Barnabas, Ignatius, Alexander, Marcellinus, Peter, Felicity, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecilia, Anastasia, and all your Saints: admit us, we beseech you, into their company, not weighing our merits, but granting us your pardon, through Christ our Lord.                  — Eucharistic Prayer I

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One Response to Hear the Text, but Hear it Slant: Liturgy Notes

  1. Fariba says:

    Love the perspective. I’d say it’s both/and. God has a preferential option for the poor, marginalized, etc. The wealthy are called to freely abandon their positions of privilege to empower those who have been disenfranchised. I think it is this mentality that was at the heart of Francis of Assisi’s mission. Of course, in our society we can go further and challenge structures that keep certain people down.

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