We Are All in the Garden

On Holy Thursday, after the procession, after we sing the Tantum Ergo, gathered around the altar of repose, I usually meditate on being in the garden with Jesus, keeping watch and praying as his friends didn’t, because they couldn’t stay awake.

This year, gazing through my screen at the tabernacle on the altar of repose, things were different.

Gazing through my screen at the physical changes in my church — which are beautiful, but have taken away something that was dear to me — and mourning that loss, it felt wrong. Foolish, and silly, and small.

I apologized to Jesus for being so distracted over such a small thing, but then I thought, “No… no, Jesus understands.” Surely, the losses he faced when he was in the garden seemed foolish, and silly, and small, compared to the purpose for which he had come. Scripture doesn’t give us much detail about his thoughts in the garden, but we can imagine:

Did I tell my friends enough? Did they understand? Will they remember? Will they remember me?

How bad is it going to be? As bad as I’m imagining? Worse?

When is it coming?

Oh, God, isn’t there any way out?

This year, it is we who are in the garden, alone and afraid of the suffering to come.

This year, Jesus keeps watch in the garden with us.

Deliver us, Lord, from every evil,

and grant us peace in our day.

In your mercy keep us free from sin,

And protect us from all anxiety,

As we wait in joyful hope

For the coming of our savior, Jesus Christ.


– Holy Thursday, 2020

This entry was posted in Liturgical year, Prayer, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to We Are All in the Garden

  1. Steven Nunes says:

    Return from Calvary

    [image: image.png]

    On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 10:34 PM Gaudete Theology wrote:

    > gaudetetheology posted: ” On Holy Thursday, after the procession, after we > sing the Tantum Ergo, gathered around the altar of repose, I usually > meditate on being in the garden with Jesus, keeping watch and praying as > his friends didn’t, because they couldn’t stay awake. This ye” >

  2. Andrew says:

    Thank you for this.
    Over the last few weeks, I’ve also been thinking about the origin of the word quarantine, which (as I’m sure you know) comes from the forty days Christ spent in the wilderness.

Post a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.