Hodie

Today, Christ is born!
Today, Salvation appears!
Today, on earth, angels sing,
archangels rejoice,
the just exult,
saying:
Glory to God in the Highest,
Alleluia!

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged | Leave a comment

Phrases and Shapes in Two Languages: Hail Mary, Ave Maria

maria_gravida_or_mary_at_the_spinning_wheel_from_nemetujvar_c-1410_hungarian_galleryThe other night, I got to praying/playing around with the Hail Mary in both English and Latin, and found some interesting differences in shape.

Here’s the traditional text, as every English-speaking Catholic child learns it:

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.
Blessed art thou amongst women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God,
pray for us sinners,
now and at the hour of our death,
Amen.

The line breaks represent the typical phrasing when it is recited.

Most Catholic children learn this prayer when they are very young. It may not be until later that we learn to recognize the scriptural origin of the first half of the prayer.

The angel appeared to Mary, and said to her:saint_gabriel_-_stained_glass_window_in_the_cloisters_of_chester_cathedral

Hail Mary, full of grace: the LORD is with you.

Her cousin Elizabeth, who was great with child in her old age as the angel had foretold, greeted her and said:

Blessed are you among all women,
and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

Because of the last phrase of the prayer, many Catholics say a Hail Mary when they hear a siren or see an ambulance; and of course it is traditional to pray at the bedside of someone who is dying.

Holy Mary, Mother of God,
pray for us sinners,
now and at the hour of our death,
Amen.

So I’m starting to see this shape, here: downward (angel from God), parallel (Elizabeth to Mary), upward (soul to heaven).

And then I decided to start praying it in Latin.

I had a couple of years of Latin in high school. It gave me enough background in the language that the Latin texts I sang in choir are reasonably comprehensible to me, so I’m actually reading the Latin, not just sounding it out. Here’s how it reads in Latin, with line breaks again indicating the phrasing that is natural to me when I recite it.

Continue reading

Posted in Catholic, Prayer | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Advent, Day 9: How can God bear to look at us.

Word: God(Damn)It*
Verse: Isaiah 23:5

Note that Isaiah 23 is not included in the Catholic Sunday lectionary. Since Catholics mostly hear the bible at mass, most of us don’t know this text.

*I said I’d put profanity behind the jump, but I’m reading this as religious discourse, not cursing.

People and priest shall fare alike:
servant and master,
Maid and mistress,
buyer and seller,
Lender and borrower,
creditor and debtor.

Water protector and pipeline constructor,
black victim and white police officer,
Immigrant and ICE agent,
landlord and renter,
Politician and constituent,
vigilante and victim.

Continue reading

Posted in Liturgical year | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Advent, Day 7: Questions, Questions, Questions

You know that thing where you read a story from scripture and ask yourself, who in this story do I identify with? I did that thing. This is what happened.

Word and verse below the jump.

Continue reading

Posted in Liturgical year | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Advent, Day Five: She Who Is

Word: Bloody
Verse: Isaiah 4:5

What if we read the LORD in Isaiah 4:2-6 through a womanly metaphor? as She Who Is, the one who writhed in labor to birth creation?

On that day,
The branch of  She Who Is will be beauty and glory,
and the fruit of the land will be honor and splendor
for the survivors of Israel.

Survivors.
Read that through the lens of abuse and rape and war and violence.

Everyone who remains in Zion,
everyone left in Jerusalem
Will be called holy:
everyone inscribed for life in Jerusalem.

Every one of the survivors will be called holy, and written into the book of life.

When She Who Is washes away
the filth of the daughters of Zion,
And purges Jerusalem’s blood from her midst
with a blast of judgment, a searing blast,

How would She wash the filth and the blood from those who have survived such things?
Gently. Lovingly. Tenderly. Carefully, so as not to hurt the bruised and broken flesh of her precious daughters any more than it had already been hurt.
Fiercely: with a fierce protective love that repudiates any possible blame or shame, that cleanses and purifies.

Then will She Who Is create,
over the whole site of Mount Zion
and over her place of assembly,

A smoking cloud by day
and a light of flaming fire by night.

Oh, then! The Holy Presence that abides and accompanies and protects, that led the people out of slavery, hid them from their pursuers, and journeyed with them in astonishing intimate immanence!

For over all, Her glory will be shelter and protection:
shade from the parching heat of day,
refuge and cover from storm and rain.

 
Glory.
Glory as protection and shelter from shame.
Glory as refuge and sanctuary.

She Who Is takes the bruised and broken and bloody survivors of violence, washes their wounds with Her own hands, abides among them, and dresses them in Her holy glory!

Glory, glory, glory…

…sings Hope.

Posted in Feminist theology, Liturgical year | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Advent, Day Four: Trumpet Blast

This year, I’m following along with an unusual Advent devotional that renders the anger and outrage of the prophets into contemporary colloquial language. Each day, there’s a word and a bible verse. On days when the word is an expletive, like today, I’ll put it behind the jump.

Continue reading

Posted in Liturgical year | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Advent, Day One: Prepared? Yeah, No.

This year, I’m following along with an unusual Advent devotional that renders the anger and outrage of the prophets into contemporary colloquial language: #FuckThisShit. For those who just can’t pray with expletives, there’s a toned-down version: #RendtheHeavens . For an introduction from one of the devotional’s co-creators, check out To Convey a Visceral Gospel, We Must Sometimes Use Visceral Language.

Each day, there’s a word and a bible verse. On days when the word is an expletive, like today, I’ll put it behind the jump.

Continue reading

Posted in Liturgical year | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

But since we are of the day, let us be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love and the helmet that is hope for salvation.

– 1 Thess 5:8

Hope, if we define it as holding to the eventual good outcome of justice and the reign of God, anchors our present situation to an eschatological framework. It therefore and thereby places our current circumstances, however distressing they may be, in the context of the ongoing story of salvation history. It weaves our stories into God’s story. Christian hope is not simply a feeling and it is not the same as optimism: it is a theological virtue that is cultivated and practiced. It is profoundly eschatological, rooted in the deep conviction of God’s justice, God’s mercy, and God’s promised reign.

Weeping, Lamentation, and Hope

Aside | Posted on by | Tagged | 2 Comments

Hear the Text, but Hear it Slant: Liturgy Notes

1. Beatitudes (Mt 5:1-12)

What if this isn’t a list of instructions? What if it’s a list of who you should suck up to? ie, a list of the really important people. What if it’s Jesus doing here what he did when he washed the disciples’ feet, and inverting/subverting/recreating hierarchy?

  • the possessors of the kingdom of heaven: the poor [in spirit]
  • those who God will console: the mourners
  • the heirs to the land: the meek
  • those who God will satisfy: the hungry and thirsty [for righteousness]
  • those to whom God will show mercy: the merciful
  • those who will see God: the clean of heart
  • the children of God: the peacemakers
  • the possessors of the kingdom of heaven: the persecuted [for righteousness’ sake]
  • those whose reward will be great in heaven: the insulted and persecuted and slandered for Jesus’ sake

Written this way, with the last phrases first, I see a chiasm (envelope form) from verses 3-10, with mercy in the central, most important location. Happy Jubilee Year of Mercy!

2. Who comes in the name of the Lord?

The setting of the Sanctus that we’re singing has an echo, sung by the choir:

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord (who comes in the name of the Lord)

But this week, I didn’t hear it as an echo: I heard it as a challenge: Who comes in the name of the Lord? You??
You sure about that? You up to that?
You wear that name Christian, you come in that name: would you pass that challenge?

3. Under Whose Roof

Happy are those who are called to the supper of the Lamb.
Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof

Called to the supper of the Lamb — read eschatologically, that’s a future invitation to a feast: come into the home of the Lamb, enter under Jesus’ roof, and share a feast.

Our response? We tell Jesus, with the Roman centurion, we’re not worthy for you to come into our home, to enter under our roof.

That’s weirdly reciprocal, but inverted.
If we’re not worthy for Jesus to enter under our roof, how much less worthy are we to enter under his?

To us, also, your servants, who, though sinners, hope in your abundant mercies, graciously grant some share and fellowship with your holy Apostles and Martyrs: with John the Baptist, Stephen, Matthias, Barnabas, Ignatius, Alexander, Marcellinus, Peter, Felicity, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecilia, Anastasia, and all your Saints: admit us, we beseech you, into their company, not weighing our merits, but granting us your pardon, through Christ our Lord.                  — Eucharistic Prayer I

Posted in Liturgy | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Lost

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Have you ever been lost?

Walking through the woods, sure you knew where you were going until the landmark you were aiming for wasn’t there.. and wasn’t there.. and still wasn’t there… and all the trees look alike and omg now what do I do, should I turn around and go back or try to figure out which direction I need to go oh shit where’d I put my compass…

Driving somewhere unfamiliar, following the directions someone gave you, but the directions don’t match what you’re looking at: did I miss a turn? where is this street going to take me? where the heck am I anyway, is this a safe part of town to stop and ask directions?

Or driving a route that you drive to work every day, but today the road is blocked off and you don’t actually know the area at all, you just learned the route… so you follow the people ahead of you and hope that they’re going the same way you are.. but apparently the 5 cars in front of you all lived in this one neighborhood and every other street is a dead end and you have no idea how to get back to a main road that will hook up with some road you know and get you back on your familiar route.

Being lost is scary.

And Jesus said to Zaccheus,
“Today salvation has come to this house
because this man too is a descendant of Abraham.
For the Son of Man has come to seek
and to save what was lost.”


For you love all things that are
and loathe nothing that you have made;
for what you hated, you would not have fashioned.
And how could a thing remain, unless you willed it;
or be preserved, had it not been called forth by you?
But you spare all things, because they are yours,
O LORD and lover of souls,
for your imperishable spirit is in all things!

Posted in Lectionary reflection | Tagged , , | 1 Comment